Sam Dubin

Sam Dubin

Sam Dubin

Sam is an M.D. Candidate, Class of 2020, at NYU School of Medicine where he is a leader of the LGBT+ People in Medicine student group. He is currently working on SO/GI data collection and implementation research as well as a qualitative assessment of transgender health access needs in New York City. Outside of school, he leads a discussion group on LGBT science and medical history at Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE). Before starting medical school, he was an HIV/STI test counselor at OSU and worked with Columbus Public Health Department’s LGBTQ Health Initiative. Sam has also worked on PrEP outreach with and insurance access research with Equitas Health. Sam received a B.S. in Neuroscience with a minor in Sexuality Studies from Ohio State University.

Alison is a medical student at NYU School of Medicine, class of 2020. She is a leader of the NYUSoM LGBT+ People in Medicine group, on the executive board of the Student Diversity Initiative, and a member of the steering committee for the New York City Free Clinic. She received her bachelor’s degree from Macalester College and, prior to entering medicine, enjoyed a career in literary publishing.

Presentation: Implementing Best Practices of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) Data Collection
Day: Friday
Time: Breakout Session 2
Where: Monroe

Presentation Description:
Best practices for collecting sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) information in clinical settings are emerging. We conducted a literature review of SOGI data collection studies, surveys, and perspectives to assess where there is consensus and/or gaps in the literature on implementing SOGI data collection. We report on the current state of SOGI data collection literature. We break down the literature into thematic subfields and review the data, consensus, or disagreement within each sub-topic relevant to SOGI data. Subtopics analyzed and discussed include: validated SOGI questions, patient response to SOGI prompts, workflow procedures, data collection modalities, training, and privacy/legal issues. Our SOGI review was used at our institution to ensure that our data collection and EHR protocol follow validated best practices. We discuss how we used our literature review to evaluate our institution’s practices and generate recommendations. We summarize the successes and setbacks of this approach and discuss how to navigate the gaps within SOGI literature. Participants, in small groups, will be given a facilitator-generated SOGI best-practices worksheet/rubric. The rubric will be formatted by the abovementioned subfields of the SOGI literature. Participants will assess their home institution’s practices in light of the literature’s recommendations, then generate a list of successes, setbacks, and an analysis of the extent the literature can impact SOGI data goal-setting at their home institution. A full group debrief will be used to share suggestions and resources, and reinforce an understanding of the utility of the SOGI data literature in making institutional changes.

Objectives:
1. Define best practices for SOGI data collection, differentiate the various subtopics within the literature, and articulate which topics have reached data-driven consensus.
2. Identify next steps for implementation of SOGI data collection at participants’ own institutions through a comparison of current best practices and institutional practices.
3. Implement accurate and safe SOGI data collection and anticipate the challenges to doing so.