John Davis

John Davis

John Davis

Dr. John Davis is an infectious diseases physician and Clinician-Educator with focus on Immunocompromised Hosts. His interests are primarily with the infectious diseases of the Immunocompromised Host, broadly defined to include patients living with HIV, who have undergone solid-organ or bone-marrow transplantation, and patients who are maintained on immunosuppressive agents. Dr. Davis’ educational interests and activities are diverse, and span the spectrum of medical education, from undergraduate and pre-professional education, including medical education and residency/fellowship training, through to continuing medical education for experienced physicians. He currently serves as the Associate Dean for Medical Education at The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

Presentation: HPV Prevention through Patient Education and Vaccination
Day: Friday
Time: Breakout Session 2
Where: TBD

Presentation Description:
Culturally sensitive communication between patients and providers is a critical component of patient education. While providers are familiar with best practices for clinical care, translating these recommendations for patients remains a challenge, which results in missed opportunities for increasing access to care by improving patient knowledge and risk perception of human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the United States with at least half of the sexually active population likely to become infected in their lifetime [1]. This burden is greatest in sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations; men who have sex with men (MSM) have significantly higher HPV infection rates than heterosexual men [2] and women who have sex with women (WSW) are less likely to receive preventive gynecological care than heterosexual women [3]. HPV infection has been linked to cervical, vulva, vaginal, penile, anal and oral cancers, and preventing HPV infection relies primarily on providing patients with education regarding safe sex practices and vaccination [4]. Timely and accurate regimen completion are essential to maximize the effectiveness and public health benefits of the vaccine [1]. Potential barriers to widespread vaccination of adolescents and young adults against HPV, particularly among communities with higher risks of HPV related cancers, include provider concerns [5] and missed opportunities to recommend the vaccine as part of a standard adolescent vaccine regimen [6]. This session will discuss patient education as a strategy for increasing access to care through culturally sensitive counseling and health behavior change, with a focus on HPV prevention through vaccination.

Presentation Objectives:
1. Recall the burden of HPV infections in sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations.
2. Explain the potential benefits of vaccination for HPV prevention.
3. Discuss barriers to implementation of vaccination in current practice.
4. Use culturally sensitive counseling to communicate the benefits of vaccination to patients.