John Davis, PhD, MD

John Davis, PhD, MD

John Davis, PhD, MD

Dr. John Davis is an infectious diseases physician and Clinician-Educator with focus on Immunocompromised Hosts. His interests are primarily with the infectious diseases of the Immunocompromised Host, broadly defined to include patients living with HIV, who have undergone solid-organ or bone-marrow transplantation, and patients who are maintained on immunosuppressive agents. Dr. Davis’ educational interests and activities are diverse, and span the spectrum of medical education, from undergraduate and pre-professional education, including medical education and residency/fellowship training, through to continuing medical education for experienced physicians. He currently serves as the Associate Dean for Medical Education at The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

Presentation: HPV: Prevention is the Face of Intervention
Day: Thursday
Time: Breakout Session 1
Where: Franklin/Hamilton

Presentation Description:
Sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations are at disproportionate risk of HPV infection and its complications, compared to straight and cis-gender populations. For example, men who have sex with men are at increased risk of anal cancer as a result of HPV infection. An estimated 61% of HIV-negative and 93% of HIV-positive gay and bisexual men have anal HPV infections, compared to 50% or less of heterosexual men (Brewer, 2010). According to the CDC, Black men have higher rates of anal cancer than white men and Hispanic men have higher rates of penile cancer than non-Hispanic men in the general population. The HPV vaccine has been available since 2006 and has significantly reduced the risk and prevalence of cervical cancer, while newer vaccines have expanded to reduce anal cancer and other HPV related cancers (W.H.O., 2007). Although vaccination rates among men and boys are significantly lower than among women and girls, a recent study found HPV vaccine acceptability was higher among men who believed their physician would recommend the vaccine (Reiter, 2010). Increasing rates of HPV vaccinations, especially among men, will improve the overall health of our population.

This session will discuss how HPV manifests in SGM populations and opportunities for targeted prevention strategies, paying close attention to strategies that both improve vaccination rates and lower HPV transmission.

Presentation Objectives:
1. Recall the burden of HPV infections in sexual/gender minority populations.
2. Describe the relationship between HPV and cancer, and how that relationship is modulated in sexual and gender minority populations, and other co-morbidities for which SGM are at risk.
3. Explain the potential benefits of vaccination for HPV in general, and for SGM populations in particular.
4. Discuss barriers to implementation of vaccination in current practice, and how to address them.


Presentation: PrEP Implementation Panel
Day: Thursday
Time: Breakout Session 4
Where: Conference Theatre

Presentation Description:
Join Moderator Dr. John Davis and panelists Matthew Lowther and Rustin Zomorodi for a discussion about PrEP.

Download presentation materials.