Jenn Chen

Jenn Chen

I grew up in a town near Bethesda, MD (commonly known due to the National Institutes of Health). Went to undergrad at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor and received my BS in Biochemistry. Took a year off to work in an animal shelter, which is where my fur kids (my dog and cat) came from. Came here July of 2015 to start medical school at Ohio State University. I’m not completely sure what field I want to go into, but I’m heavily considering surgery. My hope is that I’ll be able to give easier access to, at the very least, masculinizing top surgery.

Presentation: Making the Best Out of Your Healthcare Experience as a Gender Variant Patient
Day: Friday
Time: Breakout Session 3
Where: Franklin/Hamilton

Presentation Description:
During medical encounters, health professionals are expected to remove pre-conceived biases and prejudices in order to treat all patients with equal courtesy, respect, dignity, responsiveness, and timely attention. Unfortunately, negative attitudes toward the gender variant population are still pervasive within the medical community and are often seen influencing health professionals’ decision-making and behaviors with their gender variant patients. Studies examining current knowledge about and biases toward gender variant individuals are needed to evaluate cultural competency levels of health professionals and healthcare environments. In the meantime, patient empowerment has been shown to have a significant protective impact on social interactions and quality of medical treatment. As such, in conjunction with research and steps toward addressing cultural competency, advocacy programs empowering patients may be helpful in addressing health disparities seen in the gender variant population.

Presentation Objectives:
1. Empower gender variant patients during their medical encounters – Increase levels of confidence and generally more positive attitudes toward the patient-physician relationship.
2. Decrease number of negative interactions between gender variant patients and health professionals and personnel.
3. Decrease healthcare disparities commonly seen among gender variant individuals.